Tag Archives: New Yorker

The Psychology that Supports a Leader Like Donald Trump

Trump celebrants keep saying, “Get over it,” as if followers should be passive, either cheerleaders or out of the way. But there’s a difference between expressing disappointment or joy, and asking good questions. And it’s the American way to expect leaders and followers on both sides of the aisle to be interested in questions about patterns of […]

Language and #Leadership: How We #Fool Ourselves into Righteous Inaction

It’s hard to tell the truth. When we try, we get trapped by the lies we’ve been taught to tell and the politics we hide behind tell because it seems easier. Leaders have to stand in the center of our souls, tell the truth, and stop hiding behind euphemisms (words that make ugly things pretty) […]

Hero or Fool?: It’s Hard to Decide in the Face of Failure

Today, I’m taking a different angle on leadership, looking at another unlikely leadership lesson from the idealistic individualist Chris McCandless, whose off-the-grid Alaskan adventure ended in starvation, and sparked a novel and film, Into the Wild. Author Jon Krakauer posted a recent blog at the New Yorker describing the biochemistry of McCandless’ tragic death. Krakauer […]

New Yorker’s Romney cartoon critique: “campaign spin” vs. authentic leadership

Romney’s believable when he says what he thinks we want to hear… over and over again. – and a different message every time! This cartoon, in addition to poking fun at the permanence of media (like a tattoo – there’s always a recording!) and Romney’s gaffes — the incorrect statistic about a shrinking navy, the […]

Binders full of women: Romney’s leadership blinders where women are concerned…

Mitt’s Binders and the Missing Women Amy Davidson’s New Yorker blog says it best: “For Mitt Romney, in the second Presidential debate, women always seemed to be elsewhere. This was not the only reason that he lost the debate—and a chance to put the election away—but it was one of them.” If you look at […]